Mixed Reality

I live in a mixed reality. My time and mind are engaged with my purpose in my life—the rest of it. I spend a good part of my day, reading and writing. What I do, I feel is very hard to do, yet continue to do it with pleasure (if I can feel it). I do it because I want to do it. There are millions in the world are in the same predicament. I want them to know that you can live a normal life. My next book is about that. I am working.

My emotional part of the memory is gone. It is a different feeling. You exist in a vacuum. Like, I know somebody for fifteen years, all the memories are not erased, may be only part of it. The emotional feeling has been erased. I am still a part of the world, but, in reality, I feel I am gone to a different world. I am all alone. Even at home, I live alone in my mind.

I read about ‘brain science.’ The knowledge of memory functions is new. The authors are telling me that it is only last twenty years, the science of mind is revealing. We are in a new realization phase. We are living longer. New brain cells are possible. Neuron firing and new connections have been evidenced. You can live well at old age. Can be different.

Saffron Way!

I believe saffron diet may help to remember things.

I begin a new way of seeing things. For example, I see the influence of the memory of saffron in elderly person’s favorite dishes that have been enjoyed across the generations and cultures. I see the world in a new light, thinking of memory loss in the elderly. I believe that there is a memory connection between the saffron dishes and important social events. I hear many stories about how the memory smell or taste saffron improved memory loss.

In my research, I found many documentations of use of saffron in many areas of medicine. Saffron flower’s medicinal use expresses complexity and uncertainty. I focused my writing here on memory enhancing and its antidepressant effect.

A recent television show has caused quite a surge of renewed interest in this exotic spice. Saffron has extraordinary healing power. It may, in fact, hold promise for serious neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease…

In India saffron tea is very popular. It is said: “one who has not eaten the saffron applied dish, has eaten nothing in the world.” The point is that an elderly remembers the flavor of saffron tea and brings many memories along with it. Old memory of having saffron tea helped them to remember old events that happened years ago. Saffron is a popular spice in all international cuisines.

 

I work hard at it

I am an octogenarian. To improve my memory, I work hard at it. I try to be creative and learn new things. I think the aging mind can be very powerful in charting the unknowns. It is not going to be an easy fight.

When I was young, I used to watch how an ironsmith works. First, an intense fire is lit (could be anything, at my time it was coal, nowadays in some cases, it is a burning gas); some air is pumped into it to get the flame energized. A predetermined piece of iron (mostly a rod for making a sword or knife) is put on the top of the fire and let it get red hot, once the iron gets red hot, and then ironsmith keep hammering the rod until it gets the shape he desired. That’s the technic.

It worked every time. My aging mind works the same way. One must energize his mind first (learning), then set a goal and keep hammering until you finally achieve your goal. Never, ever give up. It works.

Why I Do What I Do…

This is why!

I took the wheelchair handle from Selina’s daughter’s grip and walked with her. I walked with Selina on many days. I listened very carefully what she had to say. Mostly she was talking about her recent experience with other elders who she teaches in her art class. Her experiences were telling her that it is critical that we keep our brain active for coping with old age memory loss. She still believes that saffron use in diet can help the improvement of mild cognitive impairments at old age. A tough love for saffron.
She said to me: “Will you write about saffron and the old age memory loss story for me; people has the right to know how to handle themselves at old age.”

Her granddaughter Diana and Diana’s husband Kumar both are neuroscientists. I spoke with them. They both are continuing Selina’s work on understanding old age memory loss and how to’s to slow it down. They have the permission from Selina to use her life-long work on saffron.

My brief walk with Selina changed the way I view the world. I begin to see the value of Selina’s vision of magic of saffron. Humanity matters.

So, I decided to write the story of you at old age. We are sensitive to our surroundings, who we are at old age depending upon where we have been.

Dementia: A Public Health Priority:

November is our National Alzheimer’s Disease Month.

First, what is Alzheimer’s disease? Dr. Alois Alzheimer was the first to describe this condition as a “peculiar disease” and hence the name Alzheimer was given. It affects the brain of a person, and as it progresses, the proteins in the brain of the individual begin to accumulate and form tangles. The tangles disrupt the connection of two nerve cells and die causing the brain tissue is damaged. When this happens, one will find it difficult to learn something new. At the early stage, it will attack the part of the brain which is called hippocampus. The primary role of the hippocampus is in remembering activities that happen in our daily lives. Now when it gets damaged, we tend to forget things. At the early stages, one won’t have loss of memory that happens a long time ago.

My suggestion would be to get involved this month and help raise awareness for Alzheimer’s disease. It was President Ronald Reagan who designated November as National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month in 1983. At the time, fewer than 2 million Americans had Alzheimer’s. The number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease is growing — and growing fast. An estimated 5.4 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer’s disease in 2016.

Dr. Selina’s Story

“TELL ME A FACT AND I’LL LEARN. TELL ME A TRUTH I’LL BELIEVE, BUT TELL ME A STORY AND IT WILL LIVE IN MY HEART FOREVER.”

Each one of us has a story, and this one is Dr. Selina’s story!

Dr. Selina Saffron Johnson is her official name, yet everyone calls her Dr. Selina.

Dr. Selina, MD. Ph.D., a professor of Neurology at Harvard, is well known for her compassionate work on the world’s most seductive and precious spice saffron, and her colleagues at the Boston Aging Research Institute, calls her Dr. Saffron. Saffron has been a part of a human diet and used as an herbal medicine for thousands of years. Saffron has an amazing distinct color and flavor. Finding a cure for Old Age Dementia was Dr. Selina’s Dream. From the very early in her career Dr. Selina was interested in solving the problem of age-related decline, in memory function. At first, Dr. Selina worked with saffron as an antidepressant agent and then she spent all her career on memory enhancing effects of saffron and is hopeful that saffron would do it. Dr. Selina was also a part-time geriatric physician at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). When her parents suffered Old Age Dementia, it shook her up and took additional responsibilities at the Boston Aging Research Institute working days and nights, seven days a week determined to find a cure for dementia. Dr. Selina has made many contributions to brain science working at the Institute on various projects on cognitive dysfunction and ways to increase cognition potential. Sudden tragic circumstances in her life, combined with her old age, she is now coping with dementia. However, Dr. Selina did not give up hope. She is fighting hard for a win. I knew her well when I worked with her for about ten years and then lost touch completely. And then, about 18 years later we meet again in an amazing way!

Dr. Selina, now, is a famous artist, “The Saffron Artist.” She is painting stories of the New Old Age, Coping, and Caring, expressing in distinct Saffron color paintings. They are amazingly beautiful and informative.

This story is about her tough love for humanity and medicine.

Make no mistakes; this is a story!